Coping With Being Part of ‘the Sandwich Generation’ • sunday 20 july 2014

Sandwich Generation10:45 Connections  ~ a time for personal sharing joys & concerns
10:55 Gathering ~ music

11:00 Service  ~ When you feel like someone has taken a bite out of you! Join us to hear our guest speaker Amy Boulware share her extensive knowledge about aging and taking care of our loved ones. Amy is Director of Social Services at the Jewish Community Federation.

‘Sandwiched’ refers to active caregivers who are caring for their elderly parents while simultaneously contributing to or actively raising children … ‘sandwiched’ between two slices of caregiving responsibilities. These special people have more on their plate than anyone should have to handle at one time and they are doing it with courage and grace.

Helen Solomon Memorial Service • sunday 20 july 2014

Helen Barton SolomonHelen Louise Barton Solomon, 91, passed away at home on Monday, 7 July 2014. 

Visitation with Helen Solomon’s family and friends will be held at 1pm this Sunday, July 20, at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Chattanooga, followed by a memorial service in celebration of Helen’s life at 3 pm, with a reception following.

To cherish her memory, Helen leaves her seven children, Gail Solomon, of Moab, Utah, Louise (Allen) Crowell, of Chattanooga, Karen (David) McGinley, of Bedford NH, Rose Ann (Robert) Copeland, of Chattanooga, Lee (Peggy) Solomon, of Ringgold GA, Mike (Betty) Solomon, of East Ridge, and Bart (Diana) Solomon, of Chattanooga; grandchildren, Stuart, Janna, Rachel, Leah, Ryan, Elizabeth, Joshua, Brian, Chad, Haley and Lauren; and nine great-grandchildren.

Helen was born in 1923 in Fayetteville, Arkansas, and is preceded in death by her husband, Ramon Lee Solomon; by parents, Loy and Edith Barton; and brothers, Maurice and Robert Barton. A renaissance woman in a time when most women stayed at home full-time, Helen graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Arkansas in 1945, with a major in Chemistry and minor in Geology. Helen was a business woman, a world-wide traveler, a lifelong rock collector, a teacher of gifted children, and a mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. After college, she contributed to the war effort as a chemist in the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington DC, helping to develop the coolant for the first nuclear submarine. It was in 1945, just after VJ Day, she met her husband, Ramon (Ray) Solomon. After their Washington DC, wedding in 1947, Helen joined Ray in Knoxville, where she taught chemistry at UT while Ray finished his degree. They were married for 63 years.

In 1948, Helen and Ray returned to Chattanooga, Ray’s hometown. Their first child, Gail, was born in 1949. Three more girls were added to the family, followed by three boys. Helen and Ray established several businesses together. They had a wedding photography business, covering over 500 weddings in five years. In 1953, the couple opened the first Camera & Craft store. The great success of this business led to a chain of five stores, which they owned and operated with all of their children’s assistance for over 25 years. Helen’s marketing designs for Camera & Craft won several awards from the camera industry.

In her early 50s and following her heart, Helen returned to college and earned a Masters degree in Education from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. With this degree, she completed her working career as a teacher of gifted students in Walker County GA. Countless students’ lives were touched by her compassion and flare for teaching. A truly adventurous woman, Helen delighted in all that life would bring to her, both from her own efforts and the experiences she shared with others. After retiring at 62, Helen continued her busy life with travels all over the United States with her grandchildren and friends, and traveled the world with her husband. Traveling gave Helen many opportunities to add fascinating items to the many collections she displayed throughout her home. These included her beloved rocks and minerals, miniature shoes, wooden and stone boxes, and native items gathered around the USA and the other countries she visited which would assist her in describing to others the various cultures. Many of Helen’s rocks and minerals may be viewed at the Creative Discovery Museum in downtown Chattanooga in an exhibit set up by Helen, which is an example of the teaching of children about rocks and minerals which Helen continued during her retirement.

Helen’s children fondly remember their mother for her energy, creativity, sense of adventure and wealth of knowledge. An example of that was the 1963 three-week camping trip to the American Southwest with Helen, Ray and six children, ranging in age from 4 to 14 years old (just 3 months prior to the birth of their last child). Helen was a Girl Scout leader to her daughters and other girls in East Ridge. She lead the troop in many adventures, including bus trips to New Orleans and to south Florida for a cruise for her Mariner Girl Scouts, which was financed by the efforts of the girls. Helen drove the school bus full of girls and other leaders on both trips.

Always busy with activities, Helen was a founder, with her husband, and lifelong active member of Unitarian Universalist Church of Chattanooga. She served on the Board of Trustees and as President of the church for several years. Helen was a member of the Chattanooga Geology Club for decades, serving as President for many years, which allowed her to share her lifelong passion with rocks and minerals. She was a member of the Chattanooga Civitan Club.

The family will hold private graveside services at the Chattanooga National Cemetery. The family gratefully acknowledges the support from her caregivers of many years and Hospice of Chattanooga. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Unitarian Universalist Church, 3224 Navajo Drive, Chattanooga TN 37412, or National Parkinson Foundation, Box 5018, Hagerstown MD 21741-5018. Please share your thoughts and memories of Helen at www.grissomserenity.com.

Visitation with family and friends will be held at 1pm this Sunday, July 20, at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Chattanooga, followed by a memorial service in celebration of Helen’s life at 3 pm, with a reception following.

Heart, Courage & Wisdom: Gifts from the Wizard • sunday 13 july 2014

our minister Pam Rumancik10:45 Connections  ~ a time for personal sharing joys & concerns
10:55 Gathering ~ music

11:00 Service  ~ So many times in life we go looking for those things we already have.  In her final service here, Pam reflects on the lessons learned and the gifts that were there all along.

Come and say goodbye, and share some fun, food & fellowship. Led by Pam Rumancik

 

(Our 9.30 Forum is taking the summer off.)

Independence and Inter-Dependence • sunday 6 july 2014

our minister Pam Rumancik10:45 Connections  ~ sharing joys and concerns
10:55 Gathering ~ music

11:00 Service  ~ Just past the nation’s celebration of Independence Day, we’ll look at the tensions between being in community and standing alone. What can we learn from other cultures about recognizing our inter-dependence? Led by Pam Rumancik

 

(note that we are reverting to our 11:00 sunday morning service schedule, and that our Forum is taking the next couple of months off.)

The Controversy Continues: Religion & the Schools • sunday 29 june 2014

9:45 Connections  ~ sharing joys and concerns
9:55 Gathering ~ music

10:00 Service  ~ The dominant narrative about the relationship between religion and the public schools in the US is about conformity with Constitutional law. One believes that if only folks understood the meaning of “establishment” and “free exercise” then controversy would lessen. Yet it hasn’t. In part it is due to a misunderstanding of the relevant parts of the Constitution on the part of some people, but it is also due to an ignorance on the part of many (who should know better) with the role education plays in the development of citizens and the development of civility.

Today’s speaker, Eugene Bartoo, was born in northern Pennsylvania and grew up in small towns in upstate New York. He graduated from Penn State University and did his graduate degrees at SUNY Buffalo. After teaching mathematics in high schools in New York State for ten years he took a brief turn as an Assistant Superintendent (age 31) and then joined academe at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. In 1978 he was offered a department chair at UTC in the new School of Education, which he occupied for the next 18 years. He retired as the Rout Professor of Education in 2007. He has been a member of the board of the Tennessee ACLU and is married and has four children and eight grandchildren.

11:15 Forum  ~ topic unknown